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Today features Johnny Dowd. So if you start with a rock base, add a bit of punk and run it through a gritty synth filter, here is where you’d end up. Check out his album “Twinkle Twinkle” below and listen with us today from 6-7 pm!

 

 

Johnny Dowd: working on a new record

 

  • By Hans Werksman
  • June 5th, 2018

photo: Kat Dalton (Polaroid SX-70)

Johnny Dowd is working on his next record. Too early to tell what it will sound like at this stage, but it will see the return of Kim Sherwood-Caso:

Hello good people. Working on a new record. Pretty early in the process, but so far it’s sounding like a grungy garage rock thing, circa 1965. My buddy Mike Edmondson laid down some nasty guitar tracks, and I tracked some vocals yesterday. Speaking of vocals, I’m going to get my old singing partner Kim Sherwood-Caso on this record. Sort of a return to Wrong Side of Memphis, nice and raw. Anyway, that’s what it’s sounding like at this point. Don’t hold me to it.

HCTF review of Twinkle, Twinkle.

 – Original Article

Twinkle Reviews

Blabber ‘n’ Smoke

A Glasgow view of Americana and related music and writings

Johnny Dowd. Twinkle Twinkle.

twinklecoverforsite460wJohnny Dowd continues to eviscerate Americana on this wonderful collection of popular songs from the past which are chewed up and spat out by Dowd in his unmistakable style.  The album opens with a manifesto of sorts on the updated Execute American Folklore (Again)and it’s hard not to express a chuckle when this Residents like  caustic surge of electronica mutates into  Dowd’s delivery of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. We all know this lullaby but here it’s a bad dream vividly reimagined, more akin to Der Struwwelpeter than Disney with Anna Coogan’s operatic voice adding to the disquiet. Like a mad scientist let loose in a laboratory of steam punk synths Dowd plays all the instruments on the album; farts, parps, clangs and ominous hisses permeate the disc sounding like Krautrock meets the Clangers at times. Songs such as Going Down The Road Feeling Bad, Red River Valley and Tom Dooley are punched into submission. St. James Infirmary Blues is spoken like a beat poet suffering from a benzo famine and John The Revelator is full on biblical fury as the synthesized sounds beep and warble while there’s more biblical darkness on Job 17:11-17 with Dowd coming across like a Manson type prophesiser although the song morphs from its biblical origins into an electro funk invitation to a Friday night funky party.  Dowd’s reworkings of these songs are bizarre and challenging but  he’s  continuing in the tradition of others, taking the songs and adding his own distinctive twist. I challenge anyone not to listen to his take on My Darling Clementine without a smile appearing. Website

 – Original Article

Twinkle, Twinkle by Johnny Dowd

From TheSampler,Radio New Zealand 27 March 2018

Johnny Dowd sings a few family favourites – as you’ve never heard them before. Nick Bollinger wonders whether it was worth the risk.

Johnny Dowd

Johnny Dowd Photo: (c) Kat Dalton

Don’t look now, but I think we’ve got trouble. The folk club has just been invaded by a floor singer with a questionable sense of pitch, and I don’t know what that instrument is he’s holding but it don’t look like a banjo.

The singer is, in fact, Johnny Dowd, and he’s artist I’ve admired ever since his first record Wrong Side Of Memphis came out 20 years ago: a set of his own southern gothic ballads, delivered in a voice bordering on the tuneless and accompanying himself with a rough but effective guitar.

Twinkle, Twinkle

Twinkle, Twinkle Photo: supplied

The whole thing seemed risky, yet it worked, as though a character in a Tom Waits song had seized the means of production and made his own record. Dowd has kept making his own records – fifteen at last count – and kept taking risks. He’s flirted with different settings – including lounge jazz and, believe it or not, prog rock – but the music has always been imprinted with his dark, Bukowski-esque world view. Lately he’s been trying his hand at electronica. Oh, and folk songs.

‘Tom Dooley’, the murder ballad cheerfully popularised by the Kingston Trio, is a song Johnny Dowd might almost have written himself, and no one has ever made the narrator seem more convincingly psychopathic as he does during the spoken verses. But if that one sits quite comfortably in Dowd’s oeuvre, his ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Star’is truly disturbing, and it’s not the only time Dowd does serious violence to a song held by many to be sacred. He also has a crack at the popular 18th century hymn ‘Rock Of Ages’ that goes for hip-hop and the hymnal simultaneously and I’m not sure either survives.

It’s startling, absurd and ultimately a little exhausting.

Still, an artist who doesn’t take risks is less likely to fail but by the same token is only going to give you the same stuff over and over again. Dowd is a risk-taker, so it’s always different.

Twinkle, Twinkle takes a risk and doesn’t quite carry it off, which doesn’t mean it wasn’t worth attempting, or that this experiment hasn’t simply cleared the creative paths to make way for something extraordinary. I’ll be listening to Dowd’s next one anyway, just in case.

Twinkle, Twinkle is available on Mother Jinx

 – Original Article

Uncut and The Sun review Twinkle Twinkle

 

 

 – Uncut

 

 – The Sun

aerostatica.ru reviews Twinkle Twinkle

Well, so that life does not seem to honey, let me introduce to you a gentleman named Johnny Dowd, the black sheep of modern country music. On his 16th album, he’s gutted the classics of American folk, blues and jazz and achieves this striking success.

Johnny Dowd – Twinkle, Twinkle

“There are a lot of synthesizers. A lot of singing. Many rhythm curves. These songs flow together as a soundtrack to the film about an electronic musician who got into the 19th century. “
Johnny Dowd is now about 70 years old, but few people dare to disregard such irreverent tails to sacred cows like him.

  • Johnny Dowd – Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

It was Johnny Dowd. And now his colleagues from Britain – the group “Stick In The Wheel” (“Stick in the wheel”). They also play and sing ancient folk songs, and also fill them with today’s fury and passion. “Uncut” magazine calls them “the coolest of the current bands playing traditional music.” The Guardian writes about them: “The future begins here.” And they say to themselves: “We are playing the music of our people. This is our culture. This is our heritage. “

 – Original site

Ну, а чтобы жизнь мёдом не казалась, позвольте мне представить вам джентльмена по имени Джонни Дауд, чёрную овцу современной кантри-музыки. На своём 16-м альбоме он потрошит классику американского фолка, блюза и джаза и добивается в этом разительных успехов.

Johnny Dowd – Twinkle, Twinkle

«Много синтезаторов. Много пения. Много кривых ритмов. Эти песни льются вместе как звуковая дорожка к фильму про электронного музыканта, попавшего в 19-й век».
Джонни Дауду сейчас около 70 лет, но мало кто осмеливается так непочтительно крутить хвосты священным коровам, как он.

Da Music reviews Twinkle Twinkle

 

New Album

Hoewel je met Johnny Dowd uiteraard nooit weet, geeft het openingsnummer van ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ al aan waar de man naartoe wil: een vervolg maken op zijn ‘Execute American Folklore‘, maar dan nog verder doorgedreven.

Dat uit zich dan in de instrumentkeuze (drummachine, synth, gitaar en de stemmen van hemzelf en Anna Coogan), maar nog meer in de liedjes, die hij hier brengt. Want het betreft hier grotendeels covers van (traditionele) folksongs. Alleen kleedt hij die zodanig anders in (of uit) dat enkel nog het melodietje overblijft.

Trouble In Mind verdrinkt bijvoorbeeld in een modderpoel van synths waarover Dowd dan zijn grafrede afsteekt. Als Belg ben je uiteraard niet meteen vertrouwd met al die “klassiekers” als Going Down The Road Feeling Bad, dat dan wel een min of meer vrolijk deuntje meekrijgt, maar toch bijzonder zwartgallig overkomt, zoals dat eigenlijk met alle songs het geval is; niet in het minst met het eerder al vermelde Execute American Folklore, Again, de enige song van zijn eigen hand, waarin hij van alles “radio-active bile” maakt.

Maar naargeestig is de man allerminst. Want de humor druipt af van iets als Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star. Wrange humor, dat dan weer wel, maar desalniettemin humor. Ongetwijfeld zal hij hiermee op lange tenen trappen, want de Amerikaanse traditie, mag daar wel aan geraakt worden? Wie Dowd een beetje kent, weet daarop trouwens al meteen diens antwoord.

Dit zijn gewoon hoogst originele versies van songs als Tom DooleyHouse Of The Rising Sun (nee, het origineel is niet van The Animals) of Oh, My Darling Clementine, liedjes die hier dan wel iets bekender in de oren klinken. En dat hij de plaat afsluit met een citaat uit de bijbel zegt veel over waar hij vandaan komt; de manier waarop zegt dan weer iets over wat hij daarover denkt.

Johnny Dowd is nooit voor een gat te vangen geweest en bewijst hiermee dat zijn liedje – of het nu zijn eigen liedje dan wel een cover is – nog lang niet uitgezongen is. Deze man staat voor alles open en daarvoor kan je alleen maar bewondering hebben. Dat de muziek ook bijna kinderlijk boeiend blijft, is dan een niet te versmaden pluspunt.

Johnny Dowd trekt in januari en februari door Nederland, maar zal in België slechts één keer te zien zijn.

 – Original source

Although you never know with Johnny Dowd, the opening track of ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ already indicates where the man wants to go: making a sequel to his ‘ Execute American Folklore ‘, but then even further.

This then manifests itself in the choice of instrument (drum machine, synth, guitar and the voices of himself and Anna Coogan), but even more in the songs that he brings here. Because this mainly concerns covers of (traditional) folk songs. Only he who clothes in (or out) so different that only the melody remains.

Trouble In Mind , for example, drowns in a mud pool of synths about which Dowd then juts off his eulogy. As a Belgian, you obviously are not immediately familiar with all those “classics” as Going Down The Road Feeling Bad , which then gets a more or less cheerful tune, but still comes across as extremely black, as is actually the case with all songs; not in the least with the aforementioned Execute American Folklore, Again , the only song of his own hand, in which he makes everything “radio-active bio”.

But the man is by no means gloomy. Because the humor drips with something like Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star .Srange humor, that again, but nonetheless humor. Undoubtedly he will be keen on long toes, because the American tradition, can it be touched? Anyone who knows Dowd a little bit knows his answer right away.

These are just highly original versions of songs like Tom Dooley , House Of The Rising Sun (no, the original is not from The Animals) or Oh, My Darling Clementine , songs that sound a bit more familiar here. And that he closes the record with a quote from the Bible says a lot about where he comes from; the way in which then says something about what he thinks about it.

Johnny Dowd has never been able to catch a hole and proves that his song – whether it’s his own song or a cover – is by no means sung. This man is open to everything and for that you can only admire. The fact that the music also remains almost childishly fascinating is a plus point.

Johnny Dowd travels through the Netherlands in January and February , but will only be seen once in Belgium.

 – Translation by Google