Cambridge Music Reviews The Bank Eye Show in Suffolk

-Drawing by John Behm

-Drawing by John Behm

Reviews,PressReleases_CambridgeMusic,iknoweno,TheBankEye-Original Article

 

 

 

Reflections at The Bank Eye-Too Much Johnny For Words

Here’s that show at The Bank Eye we mentioned in our 4/13 post. Wish we were still there to see it, and for other reasons as well.

Photo_Bank,01 PosterArtists Featured

Ally Bain
John Behm
China De Burnay
Emily Dowd
Johnny Dowd
Lucy Hardcastle
Brian Kortelling
Rebecca Lyne
Cynthia May
Simon Pritchard
Emily Procner
Jules Talbot
Will Teather

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

That’s Your Wife Tour Day 7 – Preaching in the Fens

Day 7 – 4/13
Today we had time to visit the Church of Mary Magdalene and cemetery in Thornham..

Photo_John/ChurchPhoto_JohnnMark/Chruch/BnW

 

 

 

 

 

John played harmonica tonight for what seemed like an entire audience ofPhoto_JohnMark/Eye artists at The Bank Eye. First time so far, but hopefully not the last.

 

Many drawings of John were made, and we hear a bit of work by our own JDF editor Emily will appear in a show sometime.

 

Thanks also for the hospitality, and the lovely accommodations at Bulls Hall in Occold.

Photo_John/BullsHall

The Lotterman Diaries

13 april – Eye
Vandaag speelden we in een klein dorpje dat Eye heet, in de regio Suffolk. Overdag bezochten we een 1000 jaar oude kerk, alwaar Johnny een preek gaf over het einde der tijden en de rol van Alternative Country hierin. The Bank is een oude bank, die nu gebruikt wordt als cultureel centrum (de oude kluis dient als backstage). Er hing kunst aan de muur en er werden handgeschilderde ansichtkaarten verkocht.

April 13 – Eye
Today we played in a small village called Eye, in the Suffolk region. During the day we visited a 1000 year old church, where Johnny gave a sermon about the end of time and the role of Alternative Country in it. The Bank is an old bank, which is now used as a cultural center (the old safe serves as a backstage). There was art on the wall and hand-painted postcards were sold.

After a long and tiring sound check we checked in at the Bed and Breakfast where we would sleep that night. It was a short drive, but it was all worth it. It was a 15th century building, with dangerously low doors. The building was older than the invention of the window; it must have been very cold there in the past. They had thick towels, thick beds, thick pillows and a bathrobe in every room. The evening show was great. Johnny even played a piece of harmonica.