Gargon Returns


Actually no one counted anymore, but the artwork ‘Do the Gargon’ by Rik van Iersel, stolen from the Vishal on the Grote Markt in Haarlem on 25 February, is back on the surface.

On Wednesday, the person who stole the panel has brought it back again.

Wendy Tjalma was working in the office of the Vishal when one of the volunteers behind the desk came to her.

“Apparently there was a gentleman at the desk who came back with great regret and a thousand apologies.”

The man in question appeared to have taken the panel in a drunken mood in his own words during the opening of the exhibit Featuring # 01.

Tjalma is happy that the work is back. ,, It is not good to talk that someone does something like that, but the man came back with lead in his shoes and I think that to be praised. ”

Tjalma called the artist living in Eindhoven and curator Rik van Iersel to tell him that his work is above water. ,, Of course it is also happy that it is there again. It is admittedly a compliment if your work is stolen, but of course it is not cool. ”

The artwork of ten by ten centimeter is hung back where it was stolen on the opening day and can still be seen there until March 18.

Original article


Editors note: More likely, Gargon was drunk and stole the guy. reviews Twinkle Twinkle – CD Release @ The Dock Tonite 2/17

Johnny Dowd “Twinkle, Twinkle” (Seven Shooter Music, 2017)

New AlbumFrom beneath the waters of this dark and eerie sonic soundscape emerge some of the most well-known songs in the American canon. The songs on this fine album are as familiar as, well, ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star’ – the title cut – along with ‘Tom Dooley’, ‘Oh My Darling Clementine’, ‘Red River Valley’, ‘St. James Infirmary’ and ‘House of the Rising Sun’. But it’s a safe bet you’ve never heard them done this way. Dowd is highly original, even eccentric. Sometimes these songs, familiar as they are, can be recognised only by the lyrics.

This album is dominated by dark, deep electronic sounds, anchored by a heavy beat. Dowd is credited with playing ‘all instruments’, but there’s little here that will remind you of any instruments you’ve ever heard before. The vocals are also handled mostly by Dowd. But ‘intones’ would be a better word than ‘sings’. Mostly he just speaks the words.

This isn’t an album you’ll put on when your Aunt Clara comes for a visit. Nor will you dance to it. Of the 13 tracks, only the opening cut – ‘Execute American Folklore, Again’ – was written by Dowd. All the others are songs for the ages. There are no spaces between the tracks. One song sinks into the sonic depths; then, soon enough, a new song emerges from the electronic murk. While the album cover lists 13 tracks, this is really one 36-minute long meditation on the great American songbook.

Dowd, 69, didn’t begin his music career until he was nearly 50, when he released the album ‘Wrong Side of Memphis’, devoted to songs of sin and murder. The album turned him into a cult figure; since then he’s released one unconventional album after another. The music can fall harshly on the ears on first listen. But the album grows on you. And while it’s not dance music, it definitely has a beat – deep pounding drums punctuate the songs.

This, in short, is a work of creativity and imagination – the work of a highly unusual mind. You’ll hear some of the most familiar American songs of all time, reinvented as if they’d been run through a mad computer. But madness and genius are closely related. ‘Twinkle, Twinkle’ is an album that, over time, will speak to you in many different ways. This one’s a keeper.

Oor and The Independent review Twinkle Twinkle

The older, the crazier? Next year he turns 70, but since he discovered the use of synths, electronics and beats alongside his guitar, a whole new world seems to have opened for the New York singer/guitar player.He lets himself go, wonderfully off-key and against the grain, with songs from among others Jane Taylor (etc)

‘As if Hank Williams is transformed into Captain Beefheart who bought himself a bunch of primitive electronics’ the Independent wrote. We agree. Soon he will be touring with Melle de Boer. Nice couple!

 – Translation by Tamara Veldman via Facebook


Real Roots Cafe reviews Twinkle Twinkle

Johnny Dowd, Twinkle, Twinkle

De eerste prachtige uitgave van en voor 2018 is een feit. Twinkle, Twinkle van Johnny Dowd is een release waarbij de mond meerdere malen van verbazing openvalt. Op zijn site vertelt hij in zijn eigen woorden over zijn nieuwe langspeler:“Howdy all. I have finished tracking my new record, tentatively titled Twinkle, Twinkle. All the songs are in the public domain — ‘Tom Dooley’, ‘St. James Infirmary’, ‘Red River Valley’, ‘Rock of Ages’… you get the picture. It features Anna Coogan and Mike Edmondson on vocals. If you ever wondered what folk music would sound like in an electronic setting, this is it. I’ll release it on my own label, Mother Jinx Records. Not sure when. I’ll keep you posted.” Twinkle, Twinkle staat in januari 2018. Zoveel is nu duidelijk, in de schappen van de winkels.

Dowd heeft een paar eigen composities aangevuld met Amerikaanse liedjes uit een ver en muzikaal verleden. ‘The Cuckoo’, ‘St. James Infirmary Blues’, ‘House Of The Rising Sun’ en ‘John The Revelator’ zijn overbekende traditionals. Dowd haalt elk nummer door zijn elektronische studio en stopt de nummers vol afwijkende, vreemde en verrassende klanken.

Na een eerste beluistering ligt een conclusie voor de hand. Dowd heeft zijn hand overspeeld. De nummers zijn slechts in de verte te herkennen en spatten uiteen door de wens te verbazen en misschien wel te choqueren. Precies op dat punt is er ook de oprechte verbazing. Dowd heeft de nummers aangepakt, gegeseld bijna én met respect behandeld. De glimlach op de lippen van de luisteraar om zoveel gekte, verandert af en toe in een sardonische grijns. Het verleden verdient respect, maar mag ook dienen als basis voor muzikale gekte en brille.

‘Execute American Folklore, Again’ opent en is een nummer dat Dowd bij optredens in 2016 al speelde. Hij voegt op deze release het woord Again toe. Het is bekend dat Dowd de Amerikaanse muziekgeschiedenis graag op zijn geheel eigen manier vertolkt. Op Twinkle, Twinklle gaat hij ‘again’,  opnieuw de Amerikaanse folklore te lijf.

Na vele luisterbeurten is er vooral de verbazing gebleven. ‘House Of The Rising Sun’ loopt al na ruim twee minuten moeiteloos over in ‘Oh, My Darling, Clementine’. De solo tussen de coupletten is typisch Dowd, simpel en schurend. De Amerikaanse bard melkt de nummers niet uit. Zoals altijd heeft hij lak aan conventies en schakelt bijna verveeld naar een volgend liedje.

Twinkle, Twinkle is een unieke plaat. Het is een release die te denken geeft en telkens om aandacht vraagt. De luisteraar draait nummers om gedachtes tijdens eerdere draaibeurten te bevestigen. Dowd zet iedereen continue op het verkeerde been.

Afsluitend nummer is ‘Job 17: 11 – 17’. “Thank God it’s Friday. I’m gonna have a party. Gonna have a funky, funky good time,” zingt Dowd. En dat is uiteindelijk precies wat Twinkle, Twinkle is. Een feest voor de oren van iedereen die avontuur zoekt in folklore. (Mother Jinx Records)

Zaterdag 27 Januari 2018 in Paradiso. Zaal open 21:30, Aanvang 22:00

 – Original article

Live @ The Dock Sat. 2/17 8pm

AND a guitarist named Mike !

 – Facebook Event

Johnny Dowd will celebrate the release of his new record Twinkle, Twinkle (out on January 12th) with a belated hometown show @ The Dock in Ithaca, NY on February 17th. Full band show with Michael Edmondson, Brian Wilson, Michael Stark, Kim Sherwood Caso, and Anna Coogan, with Tzar as the support act. The album is a collection of radically rearranged public domain songs. He has put up a stream of Red River Valley on his website

 – Original article



SoundBlab reviews Twinkle Twinkle


New Album

Johnny Dowd first caught my ear in 1999 with, Pictures From Life’s Other Side.Wherein he demonically skewered a maudlin Hank Williams ditty. As for the rest, it was the musical equivalent of Sam Shepherd’s, Buried Child. To this day, it remains one of my favorite albums. On Other Side’s ‘God Created Woman’ there’s the ominous line, “Meet me in the parking lot, up on level three. There’s something I gotta show you. There’s something you just gotta see.” Dowd’s latest, Twinkle Twinkle might just be that something.

His last album, Execute American Folklore, pretty much was a statement of intent. Twinkle Twinkle, takes its cue from there and then proceeds to wreak unholy carnage on what have become the standards of American Folklore. By the time he’s done, you won’t recognize them. They’re beyond redemption. Like Captain Beefheart’s Trout Mask ReplicaTwinkle Twinkle is an ornery, willfully perverse work of Art.

“The coo coo is a pretty bird,” Clarence Ashley once crooned on a scratchy bit of shellac sometime in early 20th Century. Well, Dowd’s version is just plain cuckoo. Here this well-worn standard sounds like it joined up with Devo after a 5th of Jim Beam. This bird is so mean, it will rip your heart out like a buzzard if you so much as tip toe around it. And you not only won’t recognize this ‘St. James Infirmary’, you’ll need directions home after sliding all over the guts spilled on the floor.  In Dowd’s hands, Son House’s ‘John The Revelator’ reads more like a Dear John letter to Nietzsche’s lost, dead God. ‘Tom Dooley’ gets a make- over with a pair of brass knuckles. And God help you if you’re caught snoozing in this ‘House of The Rising Sun’. If that weren’t enough, Dowd has cut the most unsettling and terrifying version of ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Star’ you’ll ever hear. Mozart must be laughing in his grave.

In terms of Dowd’s song choices, nothing on this album is arbitrary. Titles like, ‘Trouble In Mind’ and ‘Going Down The Road Feeling Bad’ have resonance in regards to what’s currently going on in the ol’ Red White and Blue. Forgive me for getting political here, but in its entirety Twinkle Twinkle can be viewed as a biting commentary on the America so many bigots like to “God bless” all the time. This album is undeniably a crooked middle finger to our political culture and times. It doesn’t take a stable genius to see that. What Dowd has laid down here, is no accident. If one’s followed Dowd’s career, he’s been moving in this direction for years. In fact, he’s always dealt these cards out. But with Twinkle Twinkle he goes for the jugular with all the gusto and surgical precision of Jack the Ripper. In fact, this little opus could have just as easily be entitled, Jack The Ripper Sings American Folk Songs. 

In any event, Twinkle Twinkle is the perfect soundtrack to the madness under the surface of our affable myths of melting pots, baseball, apple pie and fireworks on the 4th of July. Here Dowd is ripping the band aid off and staring that ugly beast right in the face. And doing it with brains, heart and moral outrage. Not to mention one hell of a twisted sense of humor.

Woody Guthrie wrote, “This Machine Kill Fascists” on his guitar for a damn good reason. Despite Pete Seeger and the Civil Rights movement, a lot of these songs were watered down by the white bread likes of the Kingston Trio. Glossed over as coffee house clap a-longs for entitled college students. Then later, came O Brother Where Art Thou and the shallow hipster Alt Country/Americana revival. By comparison, Twinkle Twinkle isn’t easy or pretty listening. But it sure has balls. Not to mention, vision. If you despised what the likes of Kingston Trio did to American Folk Music, you’ll take pure delight in this. Revenge is sweet.

 – Original article


Uncut and The Sun review Twinkle Twinkle



 – Uncut


 – The Sun

The Sante Fe New Mexican reviews Twinkle Twinkle

TERRELL’S TUNE-UP: Johnny Dowd’s Twinkle Twinkle

A version of this was published in The Santa Fe New Mexican

I love great old American folk songs and other hoary tunes from past centuries. And I love radical reinterpretations of great American folk songs, ancient murder ballads, epic love ballads, supernatural weirdness, field hollers, proto-Tin Pan Alley standards, Stephen Foster classics, and spirituals.

Neil Young’s Americana, with its fearsome take on “She’ll Be Comin’ ’Round the Mountain” (retitled “Jesus’ Chariot” and recast as an appeal to our space-alien forefathers), is a prime example of this. Lesser known is Snakefarm’s Songs From My Funeral, in which singer Anna Domino puts a funky, electronic, atmospheric twist on spooky old tunes like “St. James Infirmary Blues,” “Banks of the Ohio,” and “House of the Rising Sun.”

If stodgy old purists balked at these efforts, Johnny Dowd’s new album Twinkle, Twinkle should give them all heart attacks. Dowd doesn’t bring these songs into the present. He doesn’t take them to the future. He takes them straight to hell — and listeners not only will feel the heat, they’ll smell the devil’s breath.

With Dowd on vocals, guitar (torturing the poor thing), keyboards, and other instruments, plus backing vocals by Anna Coogan and Michael Edmondson, most of the songs here will take on different shades, spotlight hidden corners, and reveal strange new meanings. It’s like a dream in which familiar things — in this case, the lyrics of the songs — melt into menacing new forms. The closest comparison I can come up with is The Residents, those mysterious masked mutants who have applied their strange craft to the works of Elvis, Hank Williams Sr., James Brown, and others. Dowd sounds downright Residential on this album.

Dowd’s prominent drawl is not affected. He was raised in Texas and Oklahoma. But for the last few decades he has resided in Ithaca, New York, where he has earned his daily bread operating a moving company. He didn’t start recording until he was nearly fifty, when he released his 1998 debut, Wrong Side of Memphis, full of off-kilter original murder ballads and other tales of the underbelly.

Starting off Twinkle, Twinkle with an original song called “Execute American Folklore, Again” (an obvious reference to the title of his previous album), Dowd lays out his purpose. And while you’re still scratching your head over that one, he goes into the title song, a version of “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” with industrial percussion, Coogan singing a surreal soprano, and a demonic electronic voice that seems to be mocking Dowd’s earnest recitation.

That’s followed by a Dada-like take on one of my favorite folk songs. Even before Dowd got his hands on it, “The Cuckoo” was filled with mystery, with its seemingly unconnected references to Independence Day (“She never hollers cuckoo ’til the fourth day of July”) and the Jack of Diamonds robbing you of your silver and your gold. It’s an old British ballad that I suspect has evolved into a patchwork of two or three songs. It became a folk-scene standard in the ’50s when Harry Smith put Clarence Ashley’s version of it on his Anthology of American Folk Music.There are great versions by Doc Watson, The Holy Modal Rounders, Taj Mahal, Dave Alvin, and — perhaps my favorite — by Big Brother & The Holding Company. But Dowd does the most cuckoo “Cuckoo.” He makes this bird holler louder than anyone (and several months before the fourth of July).Dowd’s take on the New Orleans classic “St. James Infirmary Blues” sounds even more ominous than a song about viewing your sweetheart’s corpse in a hospital morgue is supposed to sound. He includes an opening-verse framing device that Cab Calloway and others omitted:

“… Old Joe’s barroom, it was on the corner of the square./The usual crowd was assembled, and Big Joe McKinney was there./He was standing by my shoulder. His eyes were bloodshot red/He turned to the crowd around him and these are the words he said.”

When Dowd sings the part in which the narrator fantasizes about his own funeral, he changes a line, perhaps to add cosmic significance: “Put a $20 gold piece on my watch chain/So that God will know I died standing pat.”

Other highlights of Twinkle, Twinkle include what sounds like a Martian hip-hop interpretation of “Rock of Ages.” Dowd punctuates the versions saying “Rock! I said Rock!” with a crazy guitar twang coming in behind him. On “John the Revelator,” Dowd delivers each line as if he’s relaying information that could get him killed. “Going Down the Road Feeling Bad” sounds like a road trip into another dimension. Yes, it’s strange, but I bet Woody Guthrie would have gotten a kick out of it.

And there’s “Tom Dooley,” in which Dowd ends the song by singing a verse of “Jesus Loves Me.” And on “Oh, My Darling, Clementine,” Dowd actually sings the melody, backed up by Coogan on the choruses. This is about as straight as he plays it, at least until the last minute or so of the song — in which the music gets stranger and “Jesus Loves Me” makes a return.

He ends the album with some Bible verse — “Job 17: 11-17” — taking about as many liberties with the Good Book as he does with the folk songs. The Bible says, “If I wait, the grave is my house: I have made my bed in the darkness. I have said to corruption, `You are my father’: to the worm, `You are my mother, and my sister.’” Dowd adds words you never heard in the Bible: “TGIF, thank God it’s Friday, gonna have a party. … Hey everybody, come on over to my house.”

When my kids were growing up, I warned them not to accept party invitations from strangers spouting Bible verses full of worms and death. But Dowd’s crazy party is pretty hard to resist.

Video time!

Well Hell’s bells, I couldn’t find any videos of Twinkle Twinkle songs to post here. But here are a few of my favorites from the past.

Here’s an ode to Nancy Sinatra:

To this next song, I pledged my eternal love .

And going way way back to 1999, this one from Dowd’s second album, Pictures from Life’s Other Side this one still haunts my nightmares.

 – Original site

Feeling Bad tour @ Kloveniersdoelen Feb. 11

Zondag 11 februari staat De Kloveniersdoelen in het teken van Amerikaanse Folk met Johnny Dowd en Melle de Boer. Johnny Dowd wordt één van de laatste echte Amerikaanse folkartiesten genoemd. Hoewel het moeilijk is een label op zijn muziek te plakken, wordt hij vaak vergeleken met Tom Waits, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds en Captain Beefheart. Melle de Boer heeft de Amerikaanse countrystijl geadopteerd en er zijn eigen draai aan gegeven. Hier begon hij al mee in 1999 met zijn toenmalige band Smutfish. De Boer zal in 2018 een nieuw album uitbrengen. De muziek van beide heren staat bekend als diep emotioneel, zwartgallig en experimenteel. Het beloofd een heftig middagje te worden in Middelburg!

 – Original site

Sunday, February 11, De Kloveniersdoelen is dominated by American Folk with Johnny Dowd and Melle de Boer . Johnny Dowd is known as one of the last real American folk artists. Although it is difficult to stick a label to his music, he is often compared to Tom Waits, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and Captain Beefheart. Melle de Boer has adopted the American country style and has given it its own twist. Here he started in 1999 with his former band Smutfish. De Boer will release a new album in 2018. The music of both men is known as deeply emotional, bilious and experimental. It promises to be a violent afternoon in Middelburg!

 – Translation by Google


Johnny Dowd en Melle de Boer spelen op zondag 11 februari 2018 een concert in de Kloveniersdoelen. Amerikaanse traditionals: Johnny en Melle zullen ze bijna onherkenbaar brengen. Niet oubollig, maar zoals ze nu moeten klinken, actueel, vol orpziel, elektriciteit en noodzakelijkheid. Tickets: €12,-

Als twee mensen lang genoeg graven komen ze elkaar uiteindelijk tegen. Johnny Dowd en Melle de Boer graven al jaren tunnels in de menselijke ziel. Als Orpheusen dalen ze af in de onderwereld en nemen met gevaar voor eigen leven de mooiste dingen mee naar boven. Nu komen die tunnels samen.

Johnny Dowd

Johny Dowd wordt al tijden een van de laatst overgebleven échte folk-originals genoemd. ‘Dowd is misschien niet naar de vorm, maar wel naar de geest een late volgeling van de vooroorlogse blueszangers’ NRC 2001. Johnny Dowd (geboren 29 maart 1948 in Fort Worth, Texas) is een Amerikaanse alt country musicus uit Ithaca, New York. Typisch voor zijn stijl zijn experimentele, luidruchtige pauzes in zijn liedjes en sterke gotische (in de zin van duistere en sombere) elementen in de liedjes en in de muziek. Er is ook een sterke onderstroom van zwarte humor en het absurde in zijn werk. Als singer-songwriter wordt zijn muziek vergeleken met de muziek van Tom Waits, Nick Cave en Captain Beefheart.

Melle de Boer

Vanaf 2001 is Melle bezig met het duiden van zijn ‘Amerikaanse’ muziek. Zijn band Smutfish, opgericht in 1999, heeft sinds het debuutalbum ‘Lawnmower Mind’ een omvangrijk oeuvre opgebouwd en bij verschillende platenmaatschappijen 5 cd’s opgenomen. Door optredens op onder andere Noorderslag, SXSW in Austin, Texas, de Popkomm in Berlijn en het Reeperbahn festival in Hamburg, heeft de band veel getourd door Nederland en Europa. Ook noemenswaardig is de tour met Daniel Johnston in 2007 en 2008. In 2015 vond de release van het album “Trouble” plaats bij het toonaangevende Nederlandse label Excelsior Recordings. Melle brengt begin 2018 een nieuw solo-album uit.

Kaarten: € 12,- (te koop in boekhandel de Drvkkery en online via

 – Original site

Johnny Dowd and Melle de Boer will perform a concert in the Kloveniersdoelen on Sunday 11 February 2018. American traditionals: Johnny and Melle will bring them almost unrecognizable. Not quaint, but as they should sound now, current, full of soul, electricity and necessity. Tickets: € 12, –

When two people dig long enough, they eventually meet each other. Johnny Dowd and Melle de Boer have been digging tunnels in the human soul for years. As Orpheusen they descend into the underworld and with danger to their own lives bring out the most beautiful things. Now those tunnels come together.

Johnny Dowd

Johny Dowd has been known as one of the last remaining real folk-originals. ‘Dowd may not be in the form, but in spirit a late follower of the pre-war blues singers’ NRC 2001. Johnny Dowd (born March 29, 1948 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American alto country musician from Ithaca, New York. Typical for his style are experimental, noisy pauses in his songs and strong gothic (in the sense of dark and sombre) elements in the songs and in music. There is also a strong undercurrent of black humor and the absurdity in his work. As a singer-songwriter his music is compared with the music of Tom Waits, Nick Cave and Captain Beefheart.

Melle de Boer

Since 2001 Melle has been busy interpreting his ‘American’ music. His band Smutfish, founded in 1999, has built up an extensive body of work since the debut album ‘Lawnmower Mind’ and recorded 5 CDs at various record companies. Through performances at, among others, Noorderslag, SXSW in Austin, Texas, the Popkomm in Berlin and the Reeperbahn festival in Hamburg, the band has toured a lot through the Netherlands and Europe. Also noteworthy is the tour with Daniel Johnston in 2007 and 2008. In 2015 the release of the album “Trouble” took place at the leading Dutch label Excelsior Recordings. Melle will release a new solo album in early 2018.

 – Translation by Google


Johnny Dowd en Melle de Boer vormen een winnende combinatie

Als Melle de Boer en Johnny Dowd het podium van de kleine zaal betreden, hebben ze pas twee keer eerder samengespeeld op hun Going Down the Road Feeling Bad Tour. Ze vormen samen een gelegenheidscombinatie, maar wel een winnende. Uiteraard is de dwarse Amerikaan Dowd het hoofdprogramma en De Boer zijn support, maar aan het einde van de show gaan ze samen enkele traditionals zingen zoals Dowd die onlangs uitbracht op zijn album Twinkle, Twinkle. Verwacht het onverwachte, we kennen die Dowd zo langzamerhand wel. Niets zal zijn zoals het lijkt op papier.

Johnny Dowd and Melle de Boer are a winning combination

When Melle de Boer and Johnny Dowd entered the stage of the small hall  January 27, they have only played together twice before on their Going Down the Road Feeling Bad Tour. Together they form an occasional combination, but a winning one. Obviously, Dowd, the cross-country American, is the main program and De Boer is supporting, but at the end of the show they are going to sing some traditional songs like Dowd recently released on his album Twinkle, Twinkle. Expect the unexpected, we know that Dowd slowly. Nothing will be as it appears on paper.

Striking duo with double bill
When Sugar Mountain Melle de Boer speaks for some additional explanation, he has just finished his first joint show with Johnny Dowd. That took place in Altstadt in Eindhoven ‘Rock City’. “That was great,” he still enjoys. “It was the first time there for me.” What do we have to imagine at these duo shows? The combination of ‘Melle the easy’ and ‘Johnny the difficult’ alone is remarkable enough. And then we are not talking about their music, but rather about their reputations on the human level. How do those two come together, apart from the fact that Melle designed the artwork for Johnny’s previous album Execute American Folklore?

Experimental folk turned inside out
Before we let Melle answer that question, we go back to Monday, December 4, when colleague singer-songwriter Jim White performed at the same location. In one of his stories that evening, he said that his career and that of Johnny Dowd, whom he admired, always went more or less parallel. They both made their debut about the end of the nineties with a similarly turned-out experimental folk repertoire. When, in that period, after his own show at SXSW in Austin, Texas, he hurried to Dowd’s show and afterwards agreed to address him, he got the wind from the front. ‘Oh you’re that dude who is imitating me?’ He spoke viciously. At least it does not matter that Dowd is a difficult person. Or not?

Not difficult, but a strong appearance
Melle says that image laughing at: “No, he is not a difficult man to work with. But of course he has a very strong appearance. “The joint part of the show with squeaky and creaking electronic performances of well-known folk songs has not been studied before. “I’m not really into the rehearsal space, honestly,” Melle admits from whom the idea for this double bill comes. Let us tell you now how this went, and where the guts came from to ask the question. Melle stays very calm. “I just asked him if we could play together. He then replied: “That would be more fun than a barrel or monkeys.” I had to let those words work on me. Then I understood that that is his expression to say that it was good.”

For daredevils
Prepare yourself for the craziest. Some of those traditionals have been put in an absolutely unrecognizable jacket. It forms almost food for a fun pop quiz. In reality it is about modern interpretations of someone who understands the folk idiom better than anyone else. Melle de Boer happily assists Johnny Dowd on his quest for the ultimate renditions. That requires ears that can take a beating. But that is not asking too much? Not for purists. For daredevils!

Text by: Robbert Tilli

 – translation by Google

Feeling Bad Tour @ Cloud Nine Feb. 10



Twee gelijkgestemde zielen bundelen hun krachten in de ‘Going down the road feeling bad’-tournee! Beeldend kunstenaar/muzikant Melle de Boer is frontman van de band Smutfish – hun debuutalbum Lawnmower Mind (2003), vol melancholisch existentialisme, geldt als grondlegger van de Nederlandse ‘country noir’. De Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Johnny Dowd put voor zijn uit dezelfde donkere bron als De Boer – niet voor niets wordt hij vergeleken met Nick Cave, Tom Waits en Captain Beefheart. Dowd komt in december 2017 met een nieuw album vol interpretaties van Amerikaanse folk klassiekers. De traditionele liedjes worden precies zoals ze horen te klinken gebracht door Dowd en De Boer gebracht: vol met ziel, actualiteit en elektriciteit. Verwacht geen slaperige singer-songwriteravond, maar een concert vol contrasten!


Facebook event

– Original site

Two like-minded souls join forces in the ‘Going down the road feeling bath’ tour! Visual artist / musician Melle de Boer is frontman of the band Smutfish – their debut album Lawnmower Mind (2003), full of melancholic existentialism, is the founder of the Dutch ‘country noir’.The American singer-songwriter Johnny Dowd draws for his from the same dark source as De Boer – not for nothing he is compared to Nick Cave, Tom Waits and Captain Beefheart. Dowd arrives in December 2017 with a new album full of interpretations of American folk classics. The traditional songs are brought exactly as they should be brought by Dowd and De Boer: full of soul, current and electricity. Do not expect a sleepy singer-songwriter’s evening, but a concert full of contrasts!